Post(s) tagged with "Bosnia and Herzegovina"

picturesofwar:

In a July 13, 1995, an unidentified woman and her mother, refugees from Srebrenica, cry together at a UN base north of Sarajevo because they don’t know what happened to the rest of their family.(Darko Bandic/Associated Press)

picturesofwar:

In a July 13, 1995, an unidentified woman and her mother, refugees from Srebrenica, cry together at a UN base north of Sarajevo because they don’t know what happened to the rest of their family.

(Darko Bandic/Associated Press)

thepoliticalnotebook:

Today, Bosnia marks the twenty year anniversary of the outbreak of war. Honoring the memory of those killed in the siege of Sarajevo, 11,541 red chairs have been lined up in 825 rows down the capital’s streets like a river of blood: one for each of the victims from April 6, 1992 until 1995. 

[MSNBC]

Photos: Amel Emric / AP

Mostar

Mostar

Source: travelingcolors

Forgotten war

Forgotten war

thunderperfektmind:

Al Jazeera English’s The Cafe - Bosnia’s Future

Excellent feature that gives a brief but illuminating snapshot of continuing ethnic tensions in Bosnia. I’ll admit it may be hard to follow if you aren’t familiar with the cultural background and the various key events of the war but it still gives a good overview of attitudes 15+ years later. Sanja Mihajlović (the blonde woman who was shot when she was 12 and lived in the UK) and her general attitudes closely mirror my own feelings about the region’s recent history and my general intolerance toward nationalism—frankly, I feel that discarding the crutch of nationalism is the wisest way for the entire Balkan region to proceed when mending old wounds. Emir Suljagić (the dark-skinned man who works as education minister in Sarajevo and who spoke out the most) made a lot of excellent points about a movement toward inclusive society but he also makes the critical and (appallingly) repeated error of not listening to others when they try to express their views—he justifiably wants to be heard and to have the right to his own identity but in the process totally silences others, exactly the kind of attitude that got all of us into this mess.

Full disclaimer: I am not from Bosnia but my father is a Bosnian Serb who identifies with and holds serbian citizenship. I know I have my own biases and internal conflicts about my identity but I actively work to read and study these events from all sides. Above all, I am strongly anti-nationalism and condemn the Balkan’s tendency toward vengeful ‘eye for an eye’ action.

futurejournalismproject:

The iPad circa 1994, as envisioned by the Knight Ridder Information Design Lab in Boulder, CO.

Tablets will be a whole new class of computer. They’ll weigh under two pounds. They’ll be totally portable. They’ll have a clarity of screen display comparable to ink on paper. They’ll be able to blend text, audio, and graphics together. And they’ll be a part of our daily lives around the turn of the century. We may still use the computer to create information, but we’ll use the tablet to interact with information, reading, watching, listening.

The only problem with their tablet was that they were a decade and a half ahead of their earliest customers.

Source: allthingsd.com

travelhighlights:

The Bridge by Jukka Reverberi
Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina

A monumental project to rebuild the Old Bridge to the original design, and restore surrounding structures and historic neighbourhoods was initiated in 1999 and mostly completed by Spring 2004. The money for this reconstruction was donated by Spain (who had a sizable contingent of peacekeeping troops stationed in the surrounding area during the conflict), the United States, Turkey, Italy, the Netherlands, and Croatia. A grand opening was held on July 23, 2004 under heavy security.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mostar

travelhighlights:

The Bridge by Jukka Reverberi

Mostar, Bosnia and Herzegovina

A monumental project to rebuild the Old Bridge to the original design, and restore surrounding structures and historic neighbourhoods was initiated in 1999 and mostly completed by Spring 2004. The money for this reconstruction was donated by Spain (who had a sizable contingent of peacekeeping troops stationed in the surrounding area during the conflict), the United StatesTurkeyItaly, the Netherlands, and Croatia. A grand opening was held on July 23, 2004 under heavy security.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mostar

Source: Flickr / thisisourdiet

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