Post(s) tagged with "USA"

'Afghan insider' kills three Americans

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A man in an Afghan uniform turned his weapon on American trainers working with him in the eastern province of Paktika, killing three of them, while an attacker with a grenade killed an Italian soldier in the west, officials have said.

An argument between the Afghan soldier and his trainers appeared to have led to Saturday’s shooting on an Afghan National Army base in Paktika’s Kher Qot district, according to a statement from the provincial governor’s office.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility, but NATO officials have said that most insider attacks stem from personal grudges and cultural misunderstandings rather than Taliban plots.

The international military coalition in Afghanistan said two American service members and one US civilian died. It had initially identified them as three US military personnel.

The foreigners returned fire and killed the Afghan soldier, who had no known connection to the insurgency, according to the local governor’s statement.

The deaths of the International Security Assistance Force on Saturday in the district of Khair Kot came on the same day that one Italian soldier was killed and three others were wounded when a grenade was thrown into their armoured vehicle.

An Italian soldier was killed and three were wounded in Farah city on Saturday morning when an 11-year old child threw a grenade at a NATO convoy in the western province of Farah, a Taliban spokesman said.

'Guardian angel' troops

The Italian defence ministry and military said the attack happened as the convoy was returning to base.

The four deaths on Saturday bring to 16 the number of international troops killed in Afghanistan this month, and come two days after seven Georgian soldiers were killed in a suicide car-bomb attack in the southern province of Helmand.

Scores of foreign soldiers have been killed in insider attacks, breeding fierce mistrust and threatening to derail the process of training Afghan forces to take over security duties ahead of NATO’s withdrawal next year.

The threat has become so serious that foreign soldiers working with Afghan forces are regularly watched over by so-called “guardian angel” troops to provide protection from their supposed allies.

The Taliban launched their annual spring offensive at the end of April, marking a crucial period for Afghanistan as local security forces take the lead in offensives against the insurgents.

The militants said multiple suicide bombings and insider attacks by Afghan soldiers on NATO-led troops would be used to inflict maximum casualties.

There are now about 100,000 international troops in Afghanistan, including 66,000 from the United States. Most of them are due to leave this winter.

The remaining smaller force is expected to be mostly American advisers.

However, Guido Westerwelle, the German Foreign Minister said on Saturday during a surprise visit to Kabul that the German government was thinking about leaving behind 600-800 troops after 2014.

"The departure of our troops from Afghanistan will happen as planned but at the same time we will not forget about Afghanistan in the years after 2014,” Westerwelle said.

"We will engage with them in a different way.”

Source: aljazeera.com

Xan: What do you do in Portugal? It’s so far from your country!

Bàrbara: Working. I do… reportages and take pictures. To the Americans this is a primitive land.

lLdlF

Source: mutualassureddistraction

Top 10 warning signs of ‘liberal imperialism’

Are you a liberal imperialist? Liberal imperialists are like kinder, gentler neoconservatives: Like neocons, they believe it’s America’s responsibility to right political and humanitarian wrongs around the world, and they’re comfortable with the idea of the United States deciding who will run countries such as Libya, Syria, or Afghanistan. Unlike neocons, liberal imperialists embrace and support international institutions (like the United Nations), and they are driven more by concern for human rights than they are by blind nationalism or protecting the U.S.-Israel special relationship. Still, like the neocons, liberal imperialists are eager proponents for using American hard power, even in situations where it might easily do more harm than good. The odd-bedfellow combination of their idealism with neocons’ ideology has given us a lot of bad foreign policy over the past decade, especially the decisions to intervene militarily in Iraq or nation-build in Afghanistan, and today’s drumbeat to do the same in Syria. It’s not that the United States should never intervene in other countries or that its military should not undertake humanitarian missions (as it did in Indonesia following the Asian tsunami and in Haiti after a damaging earthquake). It should do so, however, only when there are vital national interests at stake or when sending U.S. troops or American arms is overwhelmingly likely to make things better. In short, decisions to intervene need to clear a very high bar and survive hardheaded questioning about what the use of force will actually accomplish. So while I often sympathize with their intentions, I’m tempted to send all liberal imperialists a sampler cross-stitched with: “The road to hell is paved with good intentions.” At a minimum, that warning might help them be just a bit more skeptical about the wisdom of their advice. But I’m lousy at needlepoint, so instead today I offer my “10 Warning Signs that You Are a Liberal Imperialist.”

#1: You frequently find yourself advocating that the United States send troops, drones, weapons, Special Forces, or combat air patrols to some country that you have never visited, whose language(s) you don’t speak, and that you never paid much attention to until bad things started happening there.

#2: You tend to argue that the United States is morally obligated to “do something” rather than just stay out of nasty internecine quarrels in faraway lands. In the global classroom that is our digitized current world, you believe that being a bystander — even thousands of miles away — is as bad as being the bully. So you hardly ever find yourself saying that “we should sit this one out.”

#3: You think globally and speak, um, globally. You are quick to condemn human rights violations by other governments, but American abuses (e.g., torture, rendition, targeted assassinations, Guantánamo, etc.) and those of America’s allies get a pass. You worry privately (and correctly) that aiming your critique homeward might get in the way of a future job.

#4: You are a strong proponent of international law, except when it gets in the way of Doing the Right Thing. Then you emphasize its limitations and explain why the United States doesn’t need to be bound by it in this case.

#5: You belong to the respectful chorus of those who publicly praise the service of anyone in the U.S. military, but you would probably discourage your own progeny from pursuing a military career.

#6. Even if you don’t know very much about military history, logistics, or modern military operations, you are still convinced that military power can achieve complex political objectives at relatively low cost.

#7: To your credit, you have powerful sympathies for anyone opposing a tyrant. Unfortunately, you tend not to ask whether rebels, exiles, and other anti-regime forces are trying to enlist your support by telling you what they think you want to hear. (Two words: Ahmed Chalabi.)

#8. You are convinced that the desire for freedom is hard-wired into human DNA and that Western-style liberal democracy is the only legitimate form of government. Accordingly, you believe that democracy can triumph anywhere — even in deeply divided societies that have never been democratic before — if outsiders provide enough help.

#9. You respect the arguments of those who are skeptical about intervening, but you secretly believe that they don’t really care about saving human lives.

#10. You believe that if the United States does not try to stop a humanitarian outrage, its credibility as an ally will collapse and its moral authority as a defender of human rights will be tarnished, even if there are no vital strategic interests at stake.

If you are exhibiting some or all of these warning signs, you have two choices. Option #1: You can stick to your guns (literally) and proudly own up to your interventionist proclivities. Option #2: You can admit that you’ve been swept along by the interventionist tide and seek help. If you choose the latter course, I recommend that you start by reading Alexander Downes and Jonathan Monten’s “Forced to Be Free?: Why Foreign-Imposed Regime Change Rarely Leads to Democratization” (International Security, 2013), along with Rajiv Chandrasekaran’s Little America: The War Within the War for Afghanistan and Peter Van Buren’s We Meant Well: How I Helped Lose the Battle for the Hearts and Minds of the Iraqi People. 
And if that doesn’t work, maybe we need some sort of 12-step program…

Top 10 Signs of ‘Liberal Imperialism’ by Stephen M. Walt

P.S.: I had to copy/paste the whole article, you cannot read it on the original site unless you have a subscription to Foreign Policy review

USA’s #1 export industry is not aeronautics, computers or cars, but the entertainment industry: films and TV programmes. TV is now a global presence: the number of TVs per citizen has doubled from 1980 to 1995.

Since 1976, Hollywood foreign profits have risen from 30% to 50%. In 1996, the US film industry held 76% of the European market and 83% of the Latin American one. Foreign films in the USA make up less than 3% of the market.

La Commune (Paris, 1871)

Source: mutualassureddistraction

brightmoments:

 
Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor IIIDecember 1, 1940

brightmoments:

Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor III
December 1, 1940

Source: brightmoments

toninetica:

Lee Harvey Oswald, Dallas Inmate #54018, November 23, 1963 

toninetica:

Lee Harvey Oswald, Dallas Inmate #54018, November 23, 1963 

Source: toninetica

thisisthehorrorshow:

JFK.

thisisthehorrorshow:

JFK.

Source: cosmosonic

Thanksgiving Day literally is a holiday celebrating the beginnings of the almost total extermination of an entire race of people, commonly called “Indians” and the enslavement, continued oppression and genocide of the Afrikan, by European settlers….For over 100 years now Black folks in the United States have joined with the descendants of the same European murder[er]s who enslaved them and systematically all but destroyed the Amer-Indian, in feasting and giving thanks to God for the “opportunity” to live in one of the most racist, imperialist, and oppressive countries on earth….Black People celebrating Thanksgiving Day is like the Americans celebrating the bombing of Pearl Harbor, or the so-called Jews celebrating the rise of the Third Reich, or the Palestinians celebrating the intrusion of the settler colony of Zionist Israel, or moreover the millions of Zulu descendants who are being murdered by the thousands each day, celebrating the establishment of the Union of South Africa…

- Ishakamusa Barashango (via knowledgereinsupreme)

At Play in the Fields of the Lord (1991)

At Play in the Fields of the Lord (1991)

funnywildlife:

funnywildlife:

funnywildlife:

funnywildlife:

Source:

mynameisgw:

hm.

mynameisgw:

hm.

A scary bit of news is coming out of Miami this weekend after the city police shot a naked man found eating another man’s face…Witnesses claim the officer fired half a dozen shots before the attacker finally stopped…the police are theorizing cocaine psychosis rather than zombification as the cause of the attack

-

How the zombie apocalypse starts: Naked attacker found eating man’s face

so it begins…

(via cosorosso)

Source: weheartit.com


Noam Chomsky, What We Say Goes, Lebanon and the Crisis in the Middle East, Page 18

Noam Chomsky, What We Say Goes, Lebanon and the Crisis in the Middle East, Page 18

Source: fidaiyin

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