Post(s) tagged with "arab spring"

phoebejaspe:

It’s happening already.

phoebejaspe:

It’s happening already.

Source: q4rrtsiluni

fotojournalismus:

A Yemeni anti-government protester shows her hands painted with the colours of her national flag and the slogan “Welcome revolutionaries” during a demonstration after the weekly Friday prayers in Sanaa on December 23, 2011 to reject an amnesty given to President Ali Abdullah Saleh against prosecution in a deal that eases him out of office.
[Credit : Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images]

fotojournalismus:

A Yemeni anti-government protester shows her hands painted with the colours of her national flag and the slogan “Welcome revolutionaries” during a demonstration after the weekly Friday prayers in Sanaa on December 23, 2011 to reject an amnesty given to President Ali Abdullah Saleh against prosecution in a deal that eases him out of office.

[Credit : Mohammed Huwais/AFP/Getty Images]

Source: fotojournalismus

Yemen's leader causes headaches in Washington ⇢

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

(AP) WASHINGTON - The Obama administration is weighing an unprecedented diplomatic act — whether to bar a friendly president from U.S. soil.  

American officials were evaluating on Tuesday an awkward request from Yemeni strongman and longtime U.S. counterterrorism partner Ali Abdullah Saleh. Saleh has said he plans to come to the United States for medical treatment for injuries suffered in a June assassination attempt, and he has asked for a U.S. visa for entry to the country. Fearful of appearing to harbor an autocrat with blood on his hands, the Obama administration was trying to ensure that Saleh visits only for medical care and does not plan to stay, U.S. officials said.

Washington’s hesitation reflects the shifting alliances and foreign policy strategy prompted by a year of upheaval in the Arab world. Saleh has served as an American ally against al Qaeda and will soon transfer power under a U.S.-backed deal with Yemen’s opposition aimed at ending months of instability. He isn’t subject to any U.S. or international sanctions.

But he also is accused of committing gross human rights violations during a year of internal conflict, and the U.S. is trying not to burn any bridges with Yemeni political groups likely to take part in future governments. Political asylum for Saleh in the United States, or the appearance of preferential treatment from an administration that has championed peaceful and democratic change, would be highly unpopular with Yemenis who’ve fought to depose their dictator of 33 years.

Source: fuckyeahmarxismleninism

inothernews:

Via the New York Times:

Thousands of women massed in Tahrir Square here on Tuesday afternoon  and marched to a journalists’ syndicate and back in a demonstration that  grew by the minute into an extraordinary expression of anger at the  treatment of women by the military police as they protested against  continued military rule. 
 Many held posters of the most sensational image of violence over the last weekend: a group of soldiers pulling the abaya off a prone woman to reveal her blue bra as one raises a boot to kick  her. The picture, circulated around the world, has become a rallying  point for activists opposed to military rule, though cameras also  captured soldiers pulling the clothes off other women. 
 The march, guarded by a cordon of male protesters, was a surprising turn. In Egypt,  as in other countries swept by the revolts of the Arab Spring, women  played important roles, raising hopes that broader social and political  rights would emerge along with more accountable governments. But with  the main popular focus on preparing for elections and protesting the  military’s continued hold on power, women here had grown less  politically visible. 
 The women’s protest came on the fifth day of violent clashes between  Egyptian soldiers and protesters. The severity of the military’s defense  of its hold on power, even as the newly elected Parliament begins to  take shape, has restored a degree of unity that had been missing among  the civilian political factions, liberal and Islamist, since the ouster  of President Hosni Mubarak in February.

(Photo: Asmaa Waguih / Reuters via the New York Times)

inothernews:

Via the New York Times:

Thousands of women massed in Tahrir Square here on Tuesday afternoon and marched to a journalists’ syndicate and back in a demonstration that grew by the minute into an extraordinary expression of anger at the treatment of women by the military police as they protested against continued military rule.

Many held posters of the most sensational image of violence over the last weekend: a group of soldiers pulling the abaya off a prone woman to reveal her blue bra as one raises a boot to kick her. The picture, circulated around the world, has become a rallying point for activists opposed to military rule, though cameras also captured soldiers pulling the clothes off other women.

The march, guarded by a cordon of male protesters, was a surprising turn. In Egypt, as in other countries swept by the revolts of the Arab Spring, women played important roles, raising hopes that broader social and political rights would emerge along with more accountable governments. But with the main popular focus on preparing for elections and protesting the military’s continued hold on power, women here had grown less politically visible.

The women’s protest came on the fifth day of violent clashes between Egyptian soldiers and protesters. The severity of the military’s defense of its hold on power, even as the newly elected Parliament begins to take shape, has restored a degree of unity that had been missing among the civilian political factions, liberal and Islamist, since the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak in February.

(Photo: Asmaa Waguih / Reuters via the New York Times)

The New York Times

inothernews:

INHUMANITY   Egyptian army soldiers assault and arrest a female protester during clashes in Tahrir Square in Cairo on Saturday.  The country’s military rulers escalated a bloody crackdown on street protesters, beating them and setting their tents ablaze, even as the prime  minister Kamel Ganzouri denied in a televised news conference that security forces  were using violence.  (Photo: Reuters via the New York Times)
These fucking pigs.
The whole world is watching.

inothernews:

INHUMANITY   Egyptian army soldiers assault and arrest a female protester during clashes in Tahrir Square in Cairo on Saturday.  The country’s military rulers escalated a bloody crackdown on street protesters, beating them and setting their tents ablaze, even as the prime minister Kamel Ganzouri denied in a televised news conference that security forces were using violence.  (Photo: Reuters via the New York Times)

These fucking pigs.

The whole world is watching.

The New York Times

aamir-javed:

Cairo, Eygpt: A wounded protester rests after clashes with soldiers. Egyptian troops faced crowds throwing petrol bombs as disturbances continue against military rule. The worst violence in weeks overshadowed the count in the second phase of a landmark general election

aamir-javed:

Cairo, Eygpt: A wounded protester rests after clashes with soldiers. Egyptian troops faced crowds throwing petrol bombs as disturbances continue against military rule. The worst violence in weeks overshadowed the count in the second phase of a landmark general election

thepoliticalnotebook:

Today, December 17th, is the anniversary of Tunisian street vendor Mohamed Bouazizi’s self-immolation in Sidi Bouzid.

Perhaps one of the most powerful and ultimately catalyzing instances of individual protest, Bouazizi (whose real first name is Tarek) self-immolated to protest his mistreatment at the hands of the government and the inability to make a living for himself - a pain and frustration that resonated with Tunisians, and then citizens of nations across North Africa and the Middle East. He later died on January 4th, but the protests and demonstrations that were set in motion across the region have continued to this day - so far leaving three dictators downed in their wake.

Above (clockwise from the top): demonstrators in Tunisia hold a large poster of Bouazizi (Salah Habibi/AP); graffiti in Tunisia by an unknown artist shows Bouazizi’s face and his last name in tribute to his martyr status; his cousin Walid Bouazizi mourns at his grave in Garaat Benour cemetery in Sidi Bouzid in January (Fred Dufour/AFP); Manoubia Bouazizi holds a photograph of her son (Maxpp/Zumapress).

Source: thepoliticalnotebook

cultureofresistance:

Scales continue to tip in the rich’s favor the world around.
Income inequality — the gap between a society’s richest members and its poorest — is rising not only in the United States but in most of the world’s major economies, according to a new report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.
Since 1985, income inequality has grown more pronounced in 17 of the 22 countries for which the OECD has long-term data, including Mexico, Italy, Japan, Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom.
The OECD’s report suggests an explanation for why the Occupy Wall Street movement has grown from a single protest site in New York’s Zuccotti Park to a global phenomenon with hundreds of chapters in dozens of countries. Among other things, protesters in the Occupy movement say they oppose the concentration of wealth in the hands of fewer and fewer people.
In the United States, the incomes of the very highest earners have grown by leaps and bounds over the last quarter century, while remaining more or less flat for the vast majority of the population.
Comparable growth in the wealth gap has taken place in Germany, Finland, Israel, Sweden, Luxembourg and New Zealand, according to the OECD. Only five countries — Greece, Turkey, France, Belgium and Hungary — saw their levels of income inequality decline or remain constant.
Income inequality has been linked to a number of troubling economic trends, and some analysts believe the wealth gap is contributing to the slow rate of recovery for the global economy.
Earlier this year, a study in the newsletter of the International Monetary Fund suggested that a country is more likely to enjoy a sustained period of growth if it has a relatively equitable distribution of income — meaning that for the wealthy, high-inequality nations named in the OECD report, bouncing back from the worldwide recession may be taking longer than it needs to.
Income inequality has also been cited as a catalyzing factor for a number of protest movements around the globe, including the riots in England this summer and the Arab Spring uprisings in the Middle East on which the Occupy Wall Street movement has been patterned.
An OECD press release notes that income inequality, besides affecting the wealthy member-nations of the organization, is also a major concern in many of the developing countries outside of it. The correlation between a nation’s wealth gap and its poverty and social and political instability was suggested earlier this year, when The Atlantic published a world map color-coded by inequality. China, Brazil, Rwanda, Uganda, Cote d’Ivoire and Serbia all had high levels of income inequality — as did the United States.
—
Surprise, surprise.

cultureofresistance:

Scales continue to tip in the rich’s favor the world around.

Income inequality — the gap between a society’s richest members and its poorest — is rising not only in the United States but in most of the world’s major economies, according to a new report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

Since 1985, income inequality has grown more pronounced in 17 of the 22 countries for which the OECD has long-term data, including Mexico, Italy, Japan, Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom.

The OECD’s report suggests an explanation for why the Occupy Wall Street movement has grown from a single protest site in New York’s Zuccotti Park to a global phenomenon with hundreds of chapters in dozens of countries. Among other things, protesters in the Occupy movement say they oppose the concentration of wealth in the hands of fewer and fewer people.

In the United States, the incomes of the very highest earners have grown by leaps and bounds over the last quarter century, while remaining more or less flat for the vast majority of the population.

Comparable growth in the wealth gap has taken place in Germany, Finland, Israel, Sweden, Luxembourg and New Zealand, according to the OECD. Only five countries — Greece, Turkey, France, Belgium and Hungary — saw their levels of income inequality decline or remain constant.

Income inequality has been linked to a number of troubling economic trends, and some analysts believe the wealth gap is contributing to the slow rate of recovery for the global economy.

Earlier this year, a study in the newsletter of the International Monetary Fund suggested that a country is more likely to enjoy a sustained period of growth if it has a relatively equitable distribution of income — meaning that for the wealthy, high-inequality nations named in the OECD report, bouncing back from the worldwide recession may be taking longer than it needs to.

Income inequality has also been cited as a catalyzing factor for a number of protest movements around the globe, including the riots in England this summer and the Arab Spring uprisings in the Middle East on which the Occupy Wall Street movement has been patterned.

An OECD press release notes that income inequality, besides affecting the wealthy member-nations of the organization, is also a major concern in many of the developing countries outside of it. The correlation between a nation’s wealth gap and its poverty and social and political instability was suggested earlier this year, when The Atlantic published a world map color-coded by inequality. China, Brazil, Rwanda, Uganda, Cote d’Ivoire and Serbia all had high levels of income inequality — as did the United States.

Surprise, surprise.

sterwood:

bubbabitesback:

errham:

leftcheek-rightcheek:

WATCH THIS!

“hypocrism has it’s own elegant symmetry” 

At some points you can’t even tell the difference between scenes from America or the Middle East.

sterling, please go follow elham

Done, and done.

cartoonpolitics:

The US-backed Egyptian army cleverly used the discontent of the ‘Arab Spring’  to stage a coup d’etat and seize control from US-backed Mubarak. They even managed to portray themselves as ‘friends of the people’ in the process. Well, the musicians may have changed but its been the same old song so far. Now that the deceptions sunk in, lets hope for better this time for the brave protesters who are back out in Tahir square.

cartoonpolitics:

The US-backed Egyptian army cleverly used the discontent of the ‘Arab Spring’  to stage a coup d’etat and seize control from US-backed Mubarak. They even managed to portray themselves as ‘friends of the people’ in the process. Well, the musicians may have changed but its been the same old song so far. Now that the deceptions sunk in, lets hope for better this time for the brave protesters who are back out in Tahir square.

Source: cartoonpolitics

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