Post(s) tagged with "genocide"

Thanksgiving Day literally is a holiday celebrating the beginnings of the almost total extermination of an entire race of people, commonly called “Indians” and the enslavement, continued oppression and genocide of the Afrikan, by European settlers….For over 100 years now Black folks in the United States have joined with the descendants of the same European murder[er]s who enslaved them and systematically all but destroyed the Amer-Indian, in feasting and giving thanks to God for the “opportunity” to live in one of the most racist, imperialist, and oppressive countries on earth….Black People celebrating Thanksgiving Day is like the Americans celebrating the bombing of Pearl Harbor, or the so-called Jews celebrating the rise of the Third Reich, or the Palestinians celebrating the intrusion of the settler colony of Zionist Israel, or moreover the millions of Zulu descendants who are being murdered by the thousands each day, celebrating the establishment of the Union of South Africa…

- Ishakamusa Barashango (via knowledgereinsupreme)

At Play in the Fields of the Lord (1991)

At Play in the Fields of the Lord (1991)

Source: la-historia-es-nuestra

cynicalidealism:

#Palestinians from the land of #Palestine to the refugee camps after the Nakba . We’ll be back !

Who are the Palestinian refugees?

Palestinian refugees are the indigenous inhabitants of Palestine, the majority of whom were dispossessed, were forced to run away or were expelled when the state of Israel was created in 1948 and in the years leading up to that time. This dispossession and expulsion has continued since with the second largest such event in Palestine taking place during the 1967 war, which Israel launched on its Arab neighbors and which resulted in the occupation of the Gaza Strip and the West Bank.

Palestinian refugees generally fall into three main groups: Palestinian refugees displaced in 1948, internally displaced Palestinians who remained within the areas that became the state of Israel, and Palestinian refugees displaced in 1967 from the West Bank and Gaza Strip. For the past 58 years, Israel has continued to deny Palestinian refugees their right to return to their ancenstral towns, villages and homes.

How did the Palestinian refugee problem arise?

The Palestinian refugee problem arose from a systematic policy of ethnic dispossession and elimination, the results of which are apparent in the Palestinian refugee camps and in the Palestinian Shatat (exile). These policies continue to this day.

Zionist policy sought to create an exclusive homeland for Jews in Palestine, a region that already had an indigenous population with a history stretching back thousands of years. The characterization of Palestine as “a land without a people for a people without a land” was a myth created to suggest that Palestine was waiting to be populated. Nothing was further from the truth and this has been evidenced by the atrocities of 1948 and since.

How did Israel expel Palestinians from their land?

Jewish terrorist groups such as Haganah, Irgun and Stern terrorized the Palestinian street, destroyed villages and slaughtered entire Palestinian families. Thirty four massacres were documented by Zionist historian Benny Morris to have occured within a few months: Al-Abbasiyya, Beit Daras, Bir Al-Saba’, Al-Kabri, Haifa, Qisarya. These attacks were part of Plan Dalet and aimed to annihilate the Palestinian population. Approxiamtely 50% of all Palestinian villages were destroyed in 1948 and many cities were cleared from their Palestinian population including Akka, Bir Al-Saba’, Bisan, Lod, Al-Majdal, Nazareth, Haifa, Tabaria, Yaffa, and West-Jerusalem among others.

Israeli forces killed an estimated 13,000 Palestinians and forcibly evicted 737,166 Palestinians from their homes and land. Five hundred and thirty one Palestinian villages were entirely depopulated and destroyed.

The tragedy of the refugees continued in 1967. That year, Israel occupied the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and many Palestinians were uprooted for the second time. The refugees found shelter in surrounding countries including Jordan, Syria and Egypt.

How many Palestinian refugees are there today?

Palestinians are the largest and longest suffering group of refugees in the world. One in three refugees world wide is Palestinian. There are about 7.2 million Palestinian refugees worldwide. More than 4.3 million Palestinian refugees and their descendents displaced in 1948 are registered for humanitarian assistance with the United Nations. Another 1.7 million Palestinian refugees and their descendents, also displaced in 1948, are not registered with the UN. About 355,000 Palestinians and their descendents are internally displaced i.e. inside present-day “Israel”. When the West Bank and Gaza Strip were occupied in 1967, the UN reported that approximately 200,000 Palestinians fled their homes. These 1967 refugees and their descendants today number about 834,000 persons. As a result of house demolition, revocation of residency rights and construction of illegal settlements on confiscated Palestinian owned-land, at least 57,000 Palestinians have become internally displaced in the occupied West Bank. This number includes 15,000 people so far displaced by the construction of Israel’s Annexation Wall. Such dispossession of the Palestinian population continues today.

Where do Palestinian refugees reside today?

The majority of Palestinian refugees live not far from their homes of origin either in their own homeland or in neighboring countries. More than half the refugee population lives in Jordan. Approximately 37.7% live in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, comprising about 50 percent of the population in those areas. About 15% live in almost equal numbers in Syria and Lebanon. About 355,000 internally displaced Palestinians reside in present-day Israel. The remaining refugee population lives throughout the world, including the rest of the Arab world. Of the 4.3 million refugees registered with the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), 33% live in UNRWA’s 59 refugee camps throughout the West Bank and Gaza Strip, Jordan, Syria and Lebanon.

What are the basic rights of refugees?

According to international law, refugees have the right to return to their homes of origin, receive real property restitution, and compensation for losses and damages. The UN General Assembly set forth the framework for resolving the Palestinian refugee case in UN Resolution 194 (III) which provides: repatriation for those refugees “wishing to return to their homes and live in peace with their neighbors,” or compensation for those choosing not to return. On November 22, 1974, Resolution 3236 clarified the right to return as an “inalienable right”. In Res. 302 (IV), the UN General Assembly created UNRWA and assigned the agency the task of caring for Palestinian refugees. UNRWA defined Palestinian refugees as persons who resided in Palestine two years prior to the outbreak of hostilities in 1948 and who lost their homes and livelihoods as a result of that war.

Why are Palestinian refugees excluded from coverage under UNHCR’s mandate?

When the UN adopted the Refugee Convention and established the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, it excluded those falling within the UNRWA mandate from coverage under UNHCR’s mandate. In effect, this has meant that UNHCR does not concern itself with (or count) Palestinian refugees in Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, or the West Bank and Gaza Strip, although the agency assists Palestinian refugees outside the UNRWA-mandate area. Although unintended, the effect has been that Palestinian refugees have enjoyed fewer protections than other refugees because UNRWA only has a mandate to provide Palestinian refugees with humanitarian assistance, and, unlike UNHCR, does not have a specific protection mandate.

Is something being done to rectify this exclusion?

Since the beginning of the last Palestinian uprising, the UN Commission on Human Rights, the Badil Resource Center for Palestinian Residency and Refugee Rights, and some independent refugee experts have argued that the fact that many Palestinian refugees lack effective protection should trigger the applicability of the UN Refugee Convention to Palestinians in the UNRWA mandate area. These organizations and individuals cite Article 1D of the Refugee Convention, which effectively states that whenever protection or assistance for Palestinian refugees has ceased for any reason before their situation is resolved in accordance with the relevant UN resolutions, they shall “be entitled to the benefits of this Convention.” Proponents of this view contend that UNHCR should have begun to exercise its protection mandate for Palestinian refugees long ago when it became clear that the UN Conciliation Commission for Palestine, which was concerned with protection for Palestinians, was unable to carry out its responsibilities.

Why have Palestinian refugees not returned to their homes?

The state of Israel refuses to allow Palestinian refugees to exercise their natural, legal and historic right to return citing three main arguments; first, that there is no space in Israel for the refugees to return, second, that the return of Palestinian refugees would threaten security and lead to conflict, and finally, that the return of the refugees would jeopardize the Jewish nature of the state. With regards to the first argument, recent research shows that 80% of the Jewish population of present-day ‘Israel’ resides on 15% of the land. The areas where Palestinian villages were demolished lie mainly uninhabited. Hence there is space. As for security concerns, Palestinian refugees broadly accept that exercising their right to return would not be based on the eviction of Jewish citizens but on the principles of equality and human rights. The final argument though is a testament to Israel’s false claim that it is the only democracy in the Middle East. Israel is a democracy for Jews only, and this religion-based discrimination or oxymoron should not be confused with real democracy.

Is there a durable solution?

There can be no comprehensive solution without honoring the rights of Palestinian refugees. Three UN human rights treaty committees have found key aspects of Israel’s nationality, citizenship, and land legislation which effectively bar Palestinian refugees from exercising their inalienable right to return to be incompatible with the rights codified in relevant human rights conventions. Israel’s ongoing aggression against the Palestinian people and continued pursuit of population transfer are incompatibel with the quest for peace.(x)

Source: thepalestineyoudontknow

mohamedashraf:

thepalestineyoudontknow:

Commemorating the 64 anniversary of the Nakba .
Nakba means “Catastrophe” in Arabic. It refers to the destruction of Palestinian society in 1948 when more than 750,000 Palestinians  were forced into exile by Israeli troops. Because the Palestinians were not Jewish, their presence and predominant ownership of the land were obstacles to the creation of a Jewish state. Nakba, was already nearly half-complete by May 1948, when Israel declared its independence and the Arab states entered the fray. Many Zionist leaders in Palestine openly favored “transfer” of the indigenous Palestinian population. Zionist forces used clashes that erupted as the British Mandate of Palestine came to an end in 1947-48 to rid as much of the land of its Palestinian inhabitants as possible. By the end of 1948, more than 750,000 Palestinians - two-thirds of the Palestinian population - fled in panic or were forcibly expelled. It is estimated that more than 50 percent fled under direct military assault. Others fled in panic as news of massacres - more than 100 civilians in the village of Deir Yassin and 200 in Tantura — spread. Zionist forces depopulated more than 450 Palestinian towns and villages, most of which were demolished to prevent the return of the refugees. (Figures of the number of towns and villages destroyed and depopulated vary. The Israeli daily Haaretzreports 530 lost villages.) These comprised three-quarters of the Palestinian villages inside the areas held by Israeli forces after the end of the war. The newly established Israeli government confiscated refugees’ land and properties and turned them over to Jewish immigrants. Although Jews owned only about seven percent of the land in Palestine and constituted about 33 percent of the population, Israel was established on 78 percent of Palestine.
Today, Israel uprooted an estimated 1.37 million Palestinians from their lands and homes in 1948, the Bureau says the population had increased eight times by the end of 2011 and they’re waiting for the day of the return as they keep their house keys that was taken from them .

Tomorrow, May 15th

mohamedashraf:

thepalestineyoudontknow:

Commemorating the 64 anniversary of the Nakba .

Nakba means “Catastrophe” in Arabic. It refers to the destruction of Palestinian society in 1948 when more than 750,000 Palestinians  were forced into exile by Israeli troops. Because the Palestinians were not Jewish, their presence and predominant ownership of the land were obstacles to the creation of a Jewish state. Nakba, was already nearly half-complete by May 1948, when Israel declared its independence and the Arab states entered the fray. 

Many Zionist leaders in Palestine openly favored “transfer” of the indigenous Palestinian population. Zionist forces used clashes that erupted as the British Mandate of Palestine came to an end in 1947-48 to rid as much of the land of its Palestinian inhabitants as possible. By the end of 1948, more than 750,000 Palestinians - two-thirds of the Palestinian population - fled in panic or were forcibly expelled. It is estimated that more than 50 percent fled under direct military assault. Others fled in panic as news of massacres - more than 100 civilians in the village of Deir Yassin and 200 in Tantura — spread. 

Zionist forces depopulated more than 450 Palestinian towns and villages, most of which were demolished to prevent the return of the refugees. (Figures of the number of towns and villages destroyed and depopulated vary. The Israeli daily Haaretzreports 530 lost villages.) These comprised three-quarters of the Palestinian villages inside the areas held by Israeli forces after the end of the war. The newly established Israeli government confiscated refugees’ land and properties and turned them over to Jewish immigrants. Although Jews owned only about seven percent of the land in Palestine and constituted about 33 percent of the population, Israel was established on 78 percent of Palestine.

Today, Israel uprooted an estimated 1.37 million Palestinians from their lands and homes in 1948, the Bureau says the population had increased eight times by the end of 2011 and they’re waiting for the day of the return as they keep their house keys that was taken from them .

Tomorrow, May 15th

Source: thepalestineyoudontknow

talking about Justin Bieber

talking about Justin Bieber

Source: roger-rabbit

Sweet Poisons: The Truth in Eli’s Blue Tattoos ⇢

yj3t:

David Irving, a British historian, will be in prison for the next three years after claiming for decades the Holocaust did not happen. The Austrian sentencing judge called Irving a “falsifier of history” who had academically challenged the Holocaust research of other scholars. One researcher, Deborah Lipstadt of Emory University, fought back against Irving and won but she feels Irving’s imprisonment will only make him a Free Speech martyr.

When the Western mindset of freedom and Free Speech meets anti-Muslim cartoonists and Holocaust deniers like Irving, there is a strange and dangerous conflation of the radical worst of us becoming memes for a movement. The best evidence for fighting the David Irvings and others who press lies over ugly truths is in the specificity of the body and the revelation of embedded truth that erupts to the surface when crushed into the flesh. When I was a teenager, I worked at a television station as an on-camera movie reviewer.

There was a man who worked in the film department named Eli. Eli was the only person who could take a piece of ruined raw film, fix it, and have it on the air for the evening news in five minutes. Eli was old school. He could fix anything mechanical. The new videotape revolution happening around him held no interest. He was pure celluloid and chemicals and darkrooms. Eli was a “Jew in Nebraska” and that was extremely rare in the 1980′s. He moved to Nebraska after World War II after surviving Auschwitz and surviving Auschwitz was even rarer than a Jew in Nebraska.

The proof of Eli’s survival was tattooed on his left forearm in a series of jagged and blurry numbers. When a Jew was taken into a Concentration Camp, the Nazis would tattoo Jewish forearms with numbers in order to track them much in the same way ranchers brand their cattle to prove provenance and dominion over the beast. The bright white of Eli’s forearm surrounding the blue tattoos made the numbers leap from him like ephemeral ghosts of the past dancing along the bulging purple veins in his arm. The veins and numbers trafficked horrors from a childhood spent hiding in the ditches of Germany. Eli always wore short-sleeved shirts. It didn’t matter if the temperature was 30 below zero, Eli was in short sleeves.

Eli always wanted those numbers to dance in front of the eyes of anyone who dared to look at those marks of a promise of death. There was a rumor in the newsroom that if you asked Eli about his tattoos he would never shut up about the Holocaust. Eli wasn’t Eli: Eli, the rumor claimed, was an icon for remembrance. Eli was resented for it at work. Some in the newsroom called Eli — always behind his back and forever whispered in the hushed tones of evil finding voice — the “Jew Bastard” and the “Crybaby” and the “Jew Nazi” and, most insulting of all, simply “Jew” where “Jew” was pronounced with three syllables instead of one. Eli and I were always friendly with each other.

We’d wave whenever we met eyes in the hallway. One day I went to talk to Eli about a problem I was having with a wind-up Bolex movie camera and he took me outside to show me in brighter light how to get the winding mechanism to work better. In the cold, brilliant, harsh, light of a thawing Nebraska Springtime, I was finally able to see an up-close view of Eli’s blue tattoos. The numbers were barely legible as numbers. They looked more like ancient icons and they moved as the muscles in Eli’s forearm moved.

Eli’s tattoos were the color of a bruise that would never heal. I curried up some gumption and asked Eli about his tattoos. He looked his arm and then at me and then his face slowly held a childlike hurt as if I had kicked him in the teeth with a steel-toed jackboot. He summoned up a pain-stained voice and whispered, “Never speak,” in a heavy German accent.

His eyes were overwhelming with tears and I felt terrible. I had gone beyond the obvious to ask about the specific when only the general mattered. I didn’t know what to say as Eli pierced the second knuckle of each index finger into the corner of each eye to stanch the tears. “I’m sorry,” I mumbled.

“They all gone,” he choked. “Only me.”

Eli wiped his knuckles on his shirt, crisply nodded, turned his back and walked back into the newsroom. Eli and I never spoke again. I couldn’t face his eyes and he never looked up from his work desk when I passed by in the hallway. The numbers on his forearm haunted me ever since. I grew to realize all the murmuring behind Eli’s back was a way of minimizing his suffering and the mocking of his religion and his horror were inspired by the same vicious intent of the Nazis who punctured a tattoo needle into Eli’s forearm.

Hatred wears insidious and common masks — some of them obvious and brown-shirted, some of them quieter and dressed in white shoes and polyester ties. When I hear stories from people like David Irving who claim the Holocaust was not real or that the Holocaust was a hoax or that the Holocaust is only propaganda from the Jewish cabal seeking world sympathy, I am taken back to that bright day in Nebraska where the brutality of history and the current bruising truth were revealed and relived and reviled in real time right before my eyes.

Eli may not have been able to discuss his tattoos but by always exposing his forearm to the world, he testified to the Nazi truth embedded in his arm: From ugly numbers tumble beautiful lives that must never be denied.

(Source : urbansemiotic.com)

Modern capitalist nations are the fruit of a history of slavery, genocide, violence and exploitation every bit as abhorrent as Mao’s China or Stalin’s Soviet Union. Capitalism, too, was forged in blood and tears; it is just that it has survived long enough to forget about much of this horror , which is not the case with Stalinism and Maoism.

- Terry Eagleton (via arielnietzsche)

Source: jayaprada

Source: growing-up-haunted

dany-jones:

Where are the monuments? Where are the memorial ceremonies? Unlike post-war Germany, North Americans refuse to acknowledge this genocide. Never Forget!

dany-jones:

Where are the monuments? Where are the memorial ceremonies? Unlike post-war Germany, North Americans refuse to acknowledge this genocide. Never Forget!

Source: dany-jones

mymanatee:

Henry Kissinger

Guess who lately won Nobel peace preize for similar reasons?

mymanatee:

Henry Kissinger

Guess who lately won Nobel peace preize for similar reasons?

Source: politicaldirtylaundry

androphilia:

Cartoon By Carlos Latuff For Operamundi, April 2012

androphilia:

Cartoon By Carlos Latuff For Operamundi, April 2012

Source: androphilia

booksvscigarettes:

Chechnya, Russia, Grozny, Minutka square, February 4 2000, by Dmitry Beliakov.

booksvscigarettes:

Chechnya, Russia, Grozny, Minutka square, February 4 2000, by Dmitry Beliakov.

Source: booksvscigarettes

fotojournalismus:

Grozny, Chechnya, 2001. When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, Chechnya proclaimed itself independent of Russia. In December 1994 Russian troops entered Chechnya to quash the independence movement. It is estimated that up to 100,000 people, many of them civilians, died in the ensuing 20-month war. Food and water supplies stopped within days of the Russian attack. Men and women searched for sustenance among the exploding shells, while the severity of the bombardment sometimes made it dangerous to venture out to retrieve the dead. Under Russian President Boris Yeltsin, a formal peace treaty was signed in July 1997, though the issue of independence wasn’t settled. In 1999, under the new prime minister Vladimir Putin, Russian forces re-deployed in Chechnya. Open conflict, as well as suicide bombings in Chechnya and in Moscow, continued into 2003. 
From Open Wound
[Credit : Stanley Greene]

fotojournalismus:

Grozny, Chechnya, 2001. When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, Chechnya proclaimed itself independent of Russia. In December 1994 Russian troops entered Chechnya to quash the independence movement. It is estimated that up to 100,000 people, many of them civilians, died in the ensuing 20-month war. Food and water supplies stopped within days of the Russian attack. Men and women searched for sustenance among the exploding shells, while the severity of the bombardment sometimes made it dangerous to venture out to retrieve the dead. Under Russian President Boris Yeltsin, a formal peace treaty was signed in July 1997, though the issue of independence wasn’t settled. In 1999, under the new prime minister Vladimir Putin, Russian forces re-deployed in Chechnya. Open conflict, as well as suicide bombings in Chechnya and in Moscow, continued into 2003. 

From Open Wound

[Credit : Stanley Greene]

Source: fotojournalismus

Loading more posts

I cannot give a definition about myself. I'm a changing phenomenon like you.


Ask me anything Submit

Ask

Members

Following